Rhinebecktack hotels – Po Pon http://po-pon.org/ Thu, 09 Jun 2022 10:00:31 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://po-pon.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/08/cropped-icon-32x32.png Rhinebecktack hotels – Po Pon http://po-pon.org/ 32 32 Construction begins in Hyde Park’s ‘district of the future’ https://po-pon.org/construction-begins-in-hyde-parks-district-of-the-future/ Thu, 09 Jun 2022 10:00:31 +0000 https://po-pon.org/construction-begins-in-hyde-parks-district-of-the-future/ We’ve been hearing about it for months. In fact, it’s been over a year, but we’re happy to tell you that construction has begun at Bellefield at Historic Hyde Park. The truth is that surface construction has finally begun. Apparently, projects like this also require underground construction. But the buildings are going up, and it […]]]>

We’ve been hearing about it for months. In fact, it’s been over a year, but we’re happy to tell you that construction has begun at Bellefield at Historic Hyde Park. The truth is that surface construction has finally begun. Apparently, projects like this also require underground construction. But the buildings are going up, and it seems that this “district of the future” is happening.

Bellefield at Historic Hyde Park, when complete, is supposed to include a few hotels, farm-to-fable restaurants, distilleries, a special-event barn, an amphitheater, and lots of cool shops. The plan for Bellefield is to make it a walkable village with diverse, eco-friendly housing. Sounds like a good plan.

Some residents fear that Bellefield at Historic Hyde Park will compromise the charm and history of Hyde Park, but the people behind Bellefield promise to preserve the integrity of Hyde Park. In fact, half of the 340 acres will remain forested and undeveloped, meaning there will still be plenty of beautiful nature around the village. They also plan to use some of the land for agriculture.

If all goes as planned, Bellefield at Historic Hyde Park will be a great addition to our area. Shopping, restaurants, accommodations and more, all surrounded by the beauty of the Hudson Valley. It will also create a lot of jobs, and that’s always good news. You can find out more about this innovative new development at Bellefield website. Now that construction has begun, it shouldn’t be long before we see Bellefield become a reality.

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Poughkeepsie is offering big bucks and bonuses to fill lifeguard jobs https://po-pon.org/poughkeepsie-is-offering-big-bucks-and-bonuses-to-fill-lifeguard-jobs/ Mon, 06 Jun 2022 13:11:17 +0000 https://po-pon.org/poughkeepsie-is-offering-big-bucks-and-bonuses-to-fill-lifeguard-jobs/ A raise and ridiculously high bonuses have made being a lifeguard one of the most lucrative summer jobs in the Hudson Valley. At a time when finding lifeguards has become a challenge, the town of Poughkeepsie has developed a plan to fill positions at two of its pools. In a bid to open pools in […]]]>

A raise and ridiculously high bonuses have made being a lifeguard one of the most lucrative summer jobs in the Hudson Valley.

At a time when finding lifeguards has become a challenge, the town of Poughkeepsie has developed a plan to fill positions at two of its pools. In a bid to open pools in Pulaski Park and Spratt Park, Mayor Rob Rollison has announced a pay raise and the chance to earn up to three bonuses.

Rollison says the city is doing everything it can to make sure residents enjoy its public pools.

The Town of Poughkeepsie, like many municipalities, understands that there has been a shortage of lifeguards, but we are determined to do everything we can to mobilize staff to open our two municipal pools.

The plan includes raising lifeguard salaries from $16 to $22 and offering bonuses of up to $1,500. Applicants will receive a $500 sign-up bonus and an additional $500 for making it through the summer and completing the season. The City will also offer an additional $500 bonus to any employee who refers another “fully certified lifeguard” who completes the season. Pool manager positions also receive a raise from $20 to $25 per hour and will be eligible to receive the same $1,500 in bonuses.

Currently, the Town of Poughkeepsie is working on opening both pools to residents. Pool attendant positions are also available for those able to clean and “maintain order” at Pulaski Park and Spratt Park.

Rollison says the fee will again be waived for residents if there are enough lifeguards and attendants to meet state safety and staffing requirements and pools in the town of Poughkeepsie are allowed to open.

Candidates can find more information about all these positions via the Town of Poughkeepsie website.

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These 9 Dutchess County Diners Won’t Disappoint

What the 11 clubs and bars in the Hudson Valley look like now

What 11 clubs and bars look like today.

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BUSINESS MONDAY: Marketing American Art https://po-pon.org/business-monday-marketing-american-art/ Mon, 23 May 2022 05:15:57 +0000 https://po-pon.org/business-monday-marketing-american-art/ Anyone who appreciates fine craftsmanship already knows how to make an annual pilgrimage to the Berkshire Arts Festival held at Ski Butternut every 4th of July.and weekend since 1981 (this year’s dates are July 1, 2 and 3) where the work of some 150 hand-picked exhibitors – jewelers, fashion designers, ceramists, art glassmakers, artists, sculptors, […]]]>

Anyone who appreciates fine craftsmanship already knows how to make an annual pilgrimage to the Berkshire Arts Festival held at Ski Butternut every 4th of July.and weekend since 1981 (this year’s dates are July 1, 2 and 3) where the work of some 150 hand-picked exhibitors – jewelers, fashion designers, ceramists, art glassmakers, artists, sculptors, fabricators furniture, etc. – can be found.

Joanna and Richard Rothbard, who run An American Craftsman stores and several craft shows in the Berkshires.

But not everyone knows Richard and Joanna Rothbard from American art marketing, the couple who created this show and have been running it for 22 years now. Impresarios of highly successful craft shows across the country, the Rothbards have a special connection to the Berkshires. They own An American Craftsman, which has had an outlet in the Berkshires since 1981. Their Stockbridge store operated from 1981 to 2020; the Lenox store opened in 2017, and they briefly ran a third location on Stockbridge Road in Great Barrington. And now they’re adding three new Berkshire shows to their summer schedule, all at City Park in downtown Lee, Mass. These shows in Lee will be on Memorial Day weekend, the last weekend in August, and Labor Day weekend. Each of these shows at Lee will feature a rotating line-up of 25-35 craft artists. And another show is scheduled for October 1st and 2n/a on the grounds of Shakespeare & Co. in Lenox.

Console table in glass and steel by the artist Sabra Richards. Found exclusively at An American Craftsman.

Richard Rothbard is the couple’s most public face, although Joanna has been their partner and support since 1976 when she applied for a job at her first gallery on the 29thand Street and 3rd Avenue in Manhattan, and they married in 1977. And she seems to have enjoyed riding the roller coaster of Richard’s entrepreneurial adventures while maintaining a remarkable serenity.

Jelly Fish by Weston Glass, for sale at An American Craftsman

Richard grew up in Lawrence, Long Island, where, he says, competition was fierce and results were about all that mattered. So how did a kid from Long Island, who caught the theater bug while earning a degree in finance at Hofstra University and spent many years as an actor (most notably playing Boy in The Fantastic off-Broadway) end up producing arts and crafts exhibits in the Berkshires? As you can imagine, it wasn’t a straight line, but the trip makes for a good story. And it also shows the kind of risks and rewards that come with a career as an entrepreneur in the highly competitive world of art marketing.

Painting by Peter Judge-Robles who will exhibit at Art in the Park in Lee. Photo courtesy of American Arts Marketing

As Richard tells it, he left the theater because he fell in love with a dining table. “It was the one my aunt got from George Nakashima. Nakashima worked wonders with wood, and at 27 I became a carpenter. From the 1960s he was making furniture. In 1967 he had the first of several stores in Manhattan where he and other artisans sold their work. Richard is now known for the intricate puzzle boxes he makes himself under “Boxology”. And how he started making the boxes , it’s also a story. He had moved his carpentry equipment to the basement of the store at 29and and 3rd (where he also met Joanna). One day a man from California came with some cedar logs. He had heard that Richard had a bandsaw. Could he use it to make boxes? Richard watched, then studied and learned, and within a few years was making highly polished wooden boxes and earning a reputation as the premier bandsaw box artist.

He began selling his work at shows around the country and in 1979 he was accepted as an exhibitor at the country’s first show, hosted by the American Craft Council (ACC) at the Dutchess County Fairgrounds in Rhinebeck, NY. acceptance, he knew many talented artists who had been rejected by the ACC, and he heard their grumblings.

Ceramics by Jennifer Cranna Cahalar who will exhibit at Art in the Park in Lee. Photo courtesy of American Art Marketing

So the next year, 1980, he rented the parking lot across from the fairgrounds and put on a show he called “Rejects.” “The show was a huge hit,” Rothbard says, “and it launched my career.” He had 50 exhibitors who weren’t afraid to break away from the ACC. Some 1,000 shoppers crossed the street to get to his show. The following year, “Rejects” had 150 performers, and by 1982 there were 300. In 1984, the ACC moved its show to the Big E in West Springfield, and Richard moved in next door with about 80 exhibitors under tents. Three years later, its tents housed 300 exhibitors. A few years later, the ACC moved their show to Columbus, Ohio and Richard stopped following them.

Wearable Fiber by Vilma Mare, who will be exhibiting at Art in the Park in Lee. Photo courtesy of American Arts Marketing

By then the Rothbards were already in the Berkshires. The connection with the Berkshires began in Richard’s childhood; he went to summer camp here and always wanted to come back. They also felt there was a market for fine craftsmanship in the Berkshires. Thus, the success of the first show “Rejects” in 1980 encouraged them to expand to Ski Butternut in 1981. They also opened a store in Stockbridge at the same time. Luckily, while on their way to Stockbridge to do pre-show work, an antique dealer was leaving a shop. The Rothbards were intrigued. The owner happened to be there, and they rented it on the spot. And they occupied that store until early 2020. In 2017, they purchased a building in Lenox where they were able to establish a much larger store and expand the variety of their merchandise.

Disassembled mask puzzle boxes, from Richard Rothbard’s Boxology collection. Photo courtesy of American Art Marketing

Over the years, the Rothbards have seen great changes in the arts and crafts market. In 1980, some 25,000 people came to the ACC show in Rhinebeck with money, and performers could make a very good living doing shows. At the same time, there were other prestigious places. The Philadelphia Museum and the Smithsonian have held annual craft shows. The American Craft Museum occupied a major building on the same block as the Museum of Modern Art. These shows no longer exist. People have dropped the word “craft”. For example, when the museum moved to the former Huntington Hartford Museum at Columbus Circle, it renamed itself the Museum of Art and Design.

Hot Hats by artist Carlotta Shelton, available at the upcoming Art in the Park in Lee. Photo courtesy of American Art Marketing

There are still many well-established salons, but other factors have contributed to making the business more difficult. The universe of artists who will perform is shrinking. “Before, you could organize shows with some predictability. Artists who would normally get in their vans and drive six hours or even a day or two to see a show are now hesitating. The price of gasoline discourages them. And many artists don’t want to take the risk of renting a stand. For example, the Rothbards observe, many artists in the Berkshires won’t do shows because they fear spending that upfront investment.

Rocking chair by Tom Bazis who will exhibit at Art in the Park in Lee. Photo courtesy of American Art Marketing

“The challenge of doing a show,” says Rothbard, “is that it has to be an instant hit. It’s like opening a new business in a minute. It’s a popup. People either come or they don’t, and you have no chance of developing it over weeks or months. The success of a show depends on preparation. You have to get the right mix of artists and you have to drive traffic with the right mix of promotion and advertising. “As far as I know,” continues Rothbard, “we’re one of the few promoters launching new shows.”

The Rothbards have built a solid reputation for taking care of their exhibitors and bringing in buyers. “Our model is unique as we have an ongoing organization with trade shows and outlets and now a growing online business. We even plan to open a new store in Manhattan on Lexington Avenue at 63rd Street. We have also taken care to keep our costs for artists reasonable and affordable. We are an organization that a good artist can turn to for opportunities, where they can really participate. And we work hard to attract crowds. When we arrived in Butternut, we networked like crazy among other businesses and also among hotels and hostels. The first day we had 2000 people. It was a great success, and we have done well every year since.

Painting by Jeanne DeCoste who will exhibit at Lee Art in the Park. Photo courtesy of American Art Marketing.

They enjoyed operating in the Berkshires. The business community here has been collegial and supportive. And there is a lot of interest in art among residents and visitors. “But,” concludes Rothbard, “it continues to be a challenge. For a show to be a success, people have to come and the artists have to sell. Artists come when they trust the people promoting the show, but even then no one will come if it’s too far or too expensive.

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Officials say a vehicle crashed into a building in Poughkeepsie[PICS] https://po-pon.org/officials-say-a-vehicle-crashed-into-a-building-in-poughkeepsiepics/ Tue, 17 May 2022 18:36:25 +0000 https://po-pon.org/officials-say-a-vehicle-crashed-into-a-building-in-poughkeepsiepics/ Officials were at the scene Monday afternoon after a vehicle reportedly rammed a building. There aren’t too many details available, but we do know the crash happened around 6:45 p.m., according to the East Dutchess County Fire and Rescue The Facebook page. Several groups of first responders responded to the scene according to the relief […]]]>

Officials were at the scene Monday afternoon after a vehicle reportedly rammed a building. There aren’t too many details available, but we do know the crash happened around 6:45 p.m., according to the East Dutchess County Fire and Rescue The Facebook page. Several groups of first responders responded to the scene according to the relief page.

Or

The vehicle in question is believed to have struck the structure at 264 North Road in the hamlet of Fairview (Poughkeepsie) on Monday evening. Dutchess 911 says the vehicle crashed into the Bronx Pizza Pie restaurant, which is in the building on the corner of North and West Cedar Street. It is not known how or why the vehicle crashed, or if there were any injuries. the East Holland fire and rescue page indicates that there was minor structural damage to the building.

The building’s location is across from Marist College, off Route 9, and is known to be a high-traffic area during rush hour.

According to the pictures, the damage was not that serious. And while it’s still unclear exactly what happened, it could simply have been a case of the driver accidentally accelerating when he wanted to brake.

Bronx Pizza Pie

Bronx Pizza Pie

Bronx Pizza Pie

Bronx Pizza Pie

Cars versus buildings

The Hudson Valley region has seen several accidents involving vehicles crashing into structures like this in recent years. In October 2020, a vehicle drove through the front window of the Drug Mart pharmacy outside of Monsey in Rockland County. According to Ramapo police, the accident happened at a shopping center on Airmont Road and Route 59.

Denise Nieves

Denise Nieves

Another dramatic incident involving a vehicle flying through a structure unfolded in January 2019. Officials say a car on the road took off, after the driver took a nap at the wheel and then crashed into Kirky’s Deli & Pizza in Milton. And in May 2020, two separate accidents happened in one weekend when vehicles rammed into businesses in Rhinebeck and Wappingers Falls. Police said the two vehicles jumped the curb and ended up hitting the two businesses.

KEEP READING: Here are the best places to retire in America

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Proposed Beacon Spa Hotel Mirbeau Faces Approval Process https://po-pon.org/proposed-beacon-spa-hotel-mirbeau-faces-approval-process/ Fri, 22 Apr 2022 09:06:43 +0000 https://po-pon.org/proposed-beacon-spa-hotel-mirbeau-faces-approval-process/ The property just south of the Mount Beacon parking lot dates to the late 1700s. It housed a Revolutionary War lieutenant, a Civil War general, and a famous abolitionist preacher. Parts of the area have served as a Manhattan immigrant children’s aid camp, summer residence, horse farm, school, and psychiatric hospital specializing in the treatment […]]]>

The property just south of the Mount Beacon parking lot dates to the late 1700s.

It housed a Revolutionary War lieutenant, a Civil War general, and a famous abolitionist preacher. Parts of the area have served as a Manhattan immigrant children’s aid camp, summer residence, horse farm, school, and psychiatric hospital specializing in the treatment of drug addiction.

Two decades of vacancy have left the sprawling Tioronda Estate property overgrown, with dead branches and brush obscuring views.

The red and orange exterior of his signature mansion gives the appearance of rust, punctuating his decline.

But the 161-year-old structure remains a striking sight, appearing behind the trees without warning to anyone traveling along Route 9D.

It’s a sight the City of Beacon would like to preserve and enhance, even as the mixed-use property looks set for another new use.

Mirbeau, a family business with a small chain of spas in the northeast, is seeking approvals to create its latest project on the grounds of the estate.

County State: Dutchess seeks to invest in people, programs; What to know about county plans

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Top Towns to Visit in Upstate New York https://po-pon.org/top-towns-to-visit-in-upstate-new-york/ Tue, 12 Apr 2022 11:16:03 +0000 https://po-pon.org/top-towns-to-visit-in-upstate-new-york/ Upstate New York is loosely defined as anything north of New York and Long Island. Sometimes certain additional counties are excluded, but sometimes not. There is no precise definition of what “upstate” means, but the general notion is anything outside of dense metropolises. While that excludes much of the population, it does include the vast […]]]>

Upstate New York is loosely defined as anything north of New York and Long Island. Sometimes certain additional counties are excluded, but sometimes not. There is no precise definition of what “upstate” means, but the general notion is anything outside of dense metropolises. While that excludes much of the population, it does include the vast majority of New York State’s landmass – and what a beautiful state it turns out to be. There are several key regions to focus on, including the Hudson River, the Finger Lakes, several mountain ranges, and the list goes on. As you travel through this beautiful region, keep an eye out for the following small towns worth visiting.

Lake Placid

The Lake Placid ski lift in the fall.

Lake Placid puts the ‘At the top’ in upstate New York. This village in Essex County is the northernmost community on this list. What better way to clear the mind and rejuvenate the spirit than in the crisp air of the Adirondack Mountains. You will indeed feel the resounding glory of the site which has twice hosted the Winter Olympics. Lake Placid is full of inspiring views, outdoor recreation, and a friendly mountain town vibe to top it all off.

Skaneateles

Shops and <a class=restaurants at Skaneateles Lake in Skaneateles, New York” src=”https://www.worldatlas.com/r/w768/upload/48/74/4f/shutterstock-1998814253.jpg”/>
Shops and restaurants at Skaneateles Lake in Skaneateles, New York. Editorial credit: PQK / Shutterstock.com

This Onondaga County hamlet sits atop Skaneateles Lake, which is one of the eleven Finger Lakes. The upscale city offers a relaxing waterfront atmosphere where one can unwind for a few days at the city’s famous inns and small B&Bs. Skaneateles is also a great place to appreciate history. Many homes in town are hundreds of years old and were part of the Underground Railroad.

Ithaca

Ithaca Falls in Ithaca, New York
View of Ithaca Falls on the campus of Cornell University in the Falls River Gorge, Ithaca, New York.

Ithaca, located in Tompkins County, sits at the southern tip of Cayuga Lake, another of the Finger Lakes. The iconic buildings of the Ivy League City Champions can be found all over the Cornell University campus. The charm continues in downtown Ithaca Commons and the lush natural surroundings, including gorges, waterfalls, and inspiring viewing trails. Ithaca’s population nearly doubles during the school year, which invites a more vibrant energy compared to some of the quieter communities in the area.

Lake George

Steamboat carrying tourists to view the Lake George waterfront in Lake George, New York
Passenger steamer carrying tourists on a cruise to see the sights of the Lake George waterfront and the surrounding Adirondack Mountains in Lake George, New York. Editorial credit: splask / Shutterstock.com

The small town of Lake George, located in Warren County, is another soothing pairing of the Adirondack Mountains and a bright blue lake (also called Lake George). But like Lake Placid, Lake George has its own unique impulse to complement the landscape. Tourists should be sure to navigate the vintage downtown area, and if they want to go camping, there are plenty of small islands to pitch a tent on. You can even have the place to yourself for the night. Lake George also has a strong year-round arts scene to immerse yourself in.

Canandaigua

The Ontario County Courthouse stands out on Rochester in downtown Canandaigua, New York
The Ontario County Courthouse stands out in Rochester in downtown Canandaigua, New York.

Canandaigua is a town in Ontario County, at the northern tip of Lake Canandaigua, the third Finger Lake to be mentioned so far. The 12.55 km² town is surrounded by the 161.95 km² town (both similarly populated). The city is rightly called “The Chosen Place” which translates from the modern tuscaroran title. Canandaigua offers another elegant Laketown experience, from the pristine shoreline to its elegant Main Street, to the manicured and captivating Sonnenberg Gardens.

sleepy hollow

Old Dutch Church in Sleepy Hollow, New York
Old Dutch Church in Sleepy Hollow, New York. Editorial Credit: LEE SNIDER PHOTO IMAGES / Shutterstock.com

The city is located on the eastern banks of the Hudson River, just 30 miles from New York. This picturesque and colorful village is part of the ironically and oddly named town of Mount Pleasant in Westchester County. Some people exclude this area from their “New York” borderline, but Sleepy Hollow is like an entirely different world than New York, and so it’s well within the scope of this list. Enjoy the beautiful scenery while keeping an eye out for the Headless Horseman (or at least the iconic statue).

cold spring

People walk along the main shopping district in Cold Spring, New York
People walk along the main shopping district in Cold Spring, New York. Editorial credit: James Kirkikis / Shutterstock.com

Just up the Hudson River from Sleepy Hollow is the village of Cold Spring, which resides in Philipstown in Putnam County. The half-mile-long Main Street is full of old-fashioned general store/bookstore/apothecary/restaurant type businesses. The pretty community is engulfed by beautiful green mountains ready to be explored on foot. Head to the ruins of the Cornish Estate, or for a more strenuous hike try the popular Breakneck Ridge for excellent views across the river valley. And if you have the chance, drive up the road (and, even better, over the water) to check out Bannerman’s Castle on Pollepel Island.

Glen Watkins

Seneca Lake, Watkins Glen, New York
Seneca Lake, Watkins Glen, New York.

This Schuyler County village, located at the southern end of Seneca Lake (the fourth and final Finger Lake to make this list), is home to barely 2,000 people and yet is a major tourist draw. Like many communities in the Finger Lakes region, Watkins Glen is full of natural beauty. The charming pier welcomes boaters and swimmers at the base of long, straight, and beautiful Seneca Lake. Watkins Glen State Park reveals another side of the landscape – with 19 waterfalls (which you can get up close to), hundreds of campsites, and plenty of memorable hiking trails. This humble village is also full of surprising activities with the Watkins Glen International, a major motor racing circuit that tells the story of motor racing around the town.

Woodstock

Streets and shops in Woodstock, New York
Streets and stores in Woodstock, New York. Editorial credit: solepsizm / Shutterstock.com

Although the famous festival was held near Bethel, the name and theme lives on in today’s Woodstock. This Ulster county hippie/hipster town features live music, vegan culture and around 20 colorful mum and pop shops all along Tinker Street. Woodstock has been known as a place of free and creative expression since the first artists’ colony was established in 1903. Since then, renowned musicians like Dylan and Bowie, as well as authors such as Neil Gaiman and Amy Tan, have set up shop in Woodstock. It’s a beautiful place to do beautiful things.

New Paltz

Mohonk Mountain House in New Paltz, New York
Mohonk Mountain House on a lake with a dock and a small rocky island in New Paltz, New York.

New Paltz is another Ulster county town known for its eye-catching aesthetic. This charming community sits beside the modest Wallkill River and touches on different aspects of visual appeal. For starters, the boutique cafes and boutiques of Main Street are definitely worth a visit. Next, the 17th century architecture of Rue Historic Huguenot begs to be admired. From here, one can visit the Mohonk Preserve, which uses a network of motorable roads and trails to explore the Shawangunk Mountains. Finally, a short distance away is the picturesque Mohonk Mountain House, which rises dramatically above Lake Mohonk, with a backdrop of endless evergreen forest.

Saugerties

The Saugerties Lighthouse in Saugerties, New York
The Saugerties Lighthouse in Saugerties, New York. Editorial credit: James Kirkikis / Shutterstock.com

To complete Ulster County’s trifecta of beauty, be sure to skip Saugerties, the town and village within the town, still of the same name. Saugerties is serenely positioned between the Hudson River (to the east) and the Catskill Mountains (to the west). The natural surroundings perfectly complement the pretty downtown, with a matinee theater, cafes, and cool restaurants you’d hope to find in a small upstate town. The postcard-worthy image comes from the Saugerties Lighthouse – a faded red brick house built in 1869 on the banks of the Hudson River.

Hyde Park

Hyde Park, New York
Hyde Park, New York.

The small town of Hyde Park, located in Dutchess County, has a distinct historical and architectural beauty. For starters, there’s the house of Franklin D Roosevelt, which is a National Historic Site. The Springwood Estate was not only the home of the 32nd President of the United States, who served a record four terms, but also the home of Eleanor Roosevelt and the Presidential Library and Museum of FDR, who was the first in the gender. Next on the list is the late 19th-century Beaux-Arts-style Vanderbilt Mansion, another National Historic Landmark that teaches about the Vanderbilt family’s contributions to the development of New York State. Finally, the quaint hamlet of Staatsburg dates back to 1693, when Captain Henry Pawling purchased a small piece of land from Native Americans.

Rhinebeck

Crowds of visitors to the Dutchess County Fair in Rhinebeck, New York
Crowds of visitors to the Dutchess County Fair in Rhinebeck, New York. Editorial credit: Alexanderstock23 / Shutterstock.com

Further up the east bank of the Hudson River in Dutchess County is the town and village of Rhinebeck. This place has one of those quintessential downtowns, where trees dot the sidewalks, making them feel tighter but in a relaxed way. This brings pedestrians closer to artisan shops and restaurants, among which there are many high-caliber options. The village catches the eye with its enchanted castle architecture which makes up its various historical sites, its hotels/inns and even its converted restaurants.

Upstate New York is where beauty and boundaries are hard to grasp. I hope this list does the area justice and only inspires you to explore even further.

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Mirbeau Inn & Spa Expands to Historic Estate in Beacon https://po-pon.org/mirbeau-inn-spa-expands-to-historic-estate-in-beacon/ Mon, 11 Apr 2022 15:56:30 +0000 https://po-pon.org/mirbeau-inn-spa-expands-to-historic-estate-in-beacon/ A new 85-room inn and spa is coming to a 19th-century estate in Beacon that was once a premier sanatorium at the forefront of mental health care and has seen a star-studded guest list over the years. The proposed new Mirbeau Inn & Spa Beacon will extend to the historic Tioronda Estate, abandoned for over […]]]>

A new 85-room inn and spa is coming to a 19th-century estate in Beacon that was once a premier sanatorium at the forefront of mental health care and has seen a star-studded guest list over the years.

The proposed new Mirbeau Inn & Spa Beacon will extend to the historic Tioronda Estate, abandoned for over 20 years. Mirbeau Companies, which develops European-inspired boutique hotels and resorts, currently operates hotel and spa facilities in Rhinebeck, Albany and Skaneateles in New York, as well as Plymouth, Massachusetts.

The Beacon Hotel and Spa will be modeled after a large French estate in the Loire Valley, according to a press release from Mirbeau. The 64-acre property will feature 85 gracious guest rooms spread throughout the historic mansion, a newly built “Chateau” guesthouse wing, suites and private garden cottages.

A 25,000 square foot spa will include 21 spa treatment rooms, steam rooms, saunas, a fitness center, as well as an outdoor terrace with hot pools overlooking the property’s Monet pond gardens and the estate itself, which includes specimens of original Henry Winthrop Sargent trees. dating from the 1860s.

The restored Music Room in the mansion and newly constructed additions will house a restaurant, hotel reception, library and event spaces.


History of Tioronda

From its beginnings as a Civil War general’s estate to its role as the nation’s first private residential mental health facility, Tioronda’s fascinating history is populated by names in bold, like Rosemary Kennedy, Zelda Fitzgerald and Jackie Gleason.

Related: From Sanatorium to Spa: Beacon’s Craig House Transforms Again

Shipping magnate Joseph Howland originally transformed a humble country farmhouse into a neo-Gothic style mansion which he named “Tioronda”. Howland later suffered from PTSD after the Civil War, accelerating his interest in creating a place of wellness, mental health, and relaxation.

Tioronda and its constellation of buildings and gardens were known collectively as Craig House; the estate was sold in 1917 to psychiatrist Dr. C. Jonathan Slocum. A 1935 article in Fortune magazine ranked the property as one of America’s best sanitariums for the treatment of nervous disorders, noting that those who checked in were referred to as guests, instead of patients.

Slocum and his wife have created an environment that evokes the trappings of upper-class living: access to fine dining and activities such as golf and painting, plus several dedicated staff for each guest.

Beacon’s grand mansion and gardens helped accommodate this look of a new type of sanatorium.

The property was popular not only with the wealthy but also with celebrities. Jackie Gleason was rumored to frequent Craig House to dry off, a legacy commemorated with a pool table he gifted to the Slocums and which has remained one of the residents’ favorite ways to pass the time.

Some, like Zelda Fitzgerald, have sought treatment for depression. Moved to Craig House after suffering her third nervous breakdown, she seemed to have enjoyed her time there, spending days in the care of a private nurse, painting, writing an article for Esquire magazine and playing numerous rounds of golf on the land of the property 9 -hole course.

Others stayed for years or even decades. Artist Constance Whitney Warren arrived there in 1930 and remained there until her death in 1948; Rosemary Kennedy, John F. Kennedy’s younger sister, arrived in 1957 following a botched lobotomy for a three-year stay in one of the property’s private cottages.

For still others, it was the last place they knew. Frances Seymour, wife of Henry Fonda and mother of Jane and Peter, was sent to Craig House and died there by suicide in 1950 aged 42.

Truman Capote and Marilyn Monroe are other well-known cultural figures who are said to have spent time relaxing in the cozy and low-key Craig House.

Sharon Hunt, who grew up in the area and whose grandparents met while working at Craig House, told The Times Union in September she was happy to hear the property was likely to be renovated soon in a place of health and well-being.

“I am happy to see the place regain its primary vocation: a place of healing,” she said.

Additional reporting by Caitlin Drexler Cafaro

More Hudson Valley History



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Hyde Park ‘neighborhood of the future’ postings update https://po-pon.org/hyde-park-neighborhood-of-the-future-postings-update/ Mon, 11 Apr 2022 10:00:25 +0000 https://po-pon.org/hyde-park-neighborhood-of-the-future-postings-update/ Do you remember hearing about Bellefield in Historic Hyde Park? It’s what they call the Neighborhood of the Future, and they’ve been working on it for what seems like forever. I remember writing an article almost a year ago, and to be honest, it doesn’t seem like much progress has been made since then. But […]]]>

Do you remember hearing about Bellefield in Historic Hyde Park? It’s what they call the Neighborhood of the Future, and they’ve been working on it for what seems like forever.

I remember writing an article almost a year ago, and to be honest, it doesn’t seem like much progress has been made since then. But the other day I saw an update from Bellefield on Facebook. I had almost forgotten everything.

The latest update from Bellefield to Historic Hyde Park says they are is currently constructing the underground infrastructure and plans to go vertical soon. It looks promising. Their plan is even more promising. They say Bellefield will include two hotels, farm-to-table restaurants, distilleries, stores, a barn for special events and an amphitheater. Bellefield at Historic Hyde Park will be a walkable village with diverse and environmentally friendly housing.

Will he still embrace the beauty and history of the region? According to project officials, Bellefield is made up of 340 acres, half of which will remain forested and undeveloped, and will include areas dedicated to agriculture. It’s good news. They also say maintaining the historic integrity of Hyde Park is important, and this will be reflected in the buildings. More good news.

The only question is… When will all of this actually happen? I do not have the answer to this question, but according to their Facebook page, Bellefield will continue to give updates over time. So I guess we’ll just have to keep checking.

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Rhinebeck residents fight 36 condo community project https://po-pon.org/rhinebeck-residents-fight-36-condo-community-project/ Wed, 06 Apr 2022 11:05:39 +0000 https://po-pon.org/rhinebeck-residents-fight-36-condo-community-project/ A New York-based developer known for his company’s luxury hotel projects in the Hudson Valley is offering an upscale residential housing development on a historic Rhinebeck estate. CB Developers, run by part-time Hudson Valley resident Charles Blaichman, is behind several luxury hotels in the area, including the Kinsley Hotel, a boutique hotel in Kingston, and […]]]>

A New York-based developer known for his company’s luxury hotel projects in the Hudson Valley is offering an upscale residential housing development on a historic Rhinebeck estate.

CB Developers, run by part-time Hudson Valley resident Charles Blaichman, is behind several luxury hotels in the area, including the Kinsley Hotel, a boutique hotel in Kingston, and Inness, a hotel complex and a golf course in Accord.

Now the Blaichman Company is pursuing a 36-condominium project called Rock Ledge at 492 Ackert Hook Road in Rhinebeck. A vocal group of residents, however, obtained more than 600 signatures on a petition opposing the project and shared their concerns at town meetings.

“The main concern about Rock Ledge is that the dumping of 36 private condominium developments along a rural road that is zoned to have homes built only on five acres is destroying the rural character of the area,” David said. Weiner, a member of the Rhinebeck Coalition, which was formed in response to Rock Ledge but has since expanded to monitor other developments as well.

Blaichman argues that Rock Ledge will renovate and preserve historic buildings that would otherwise remain vacant and vulnerable to decay, and that there will be even less traffic on the site than when it operated as a rehab center decades ago.

History of luxury projects in the Hudson Valley

Blaichman, known for his transformation of New York’s Meatpacking District, is no stranger to the area. After buying a house in Woodstock over 20 years ago, he also started thinking about expanding locally.

“Being in the Hudson Valley, I always thought there was potential there too,” said Blaichman, who restored four historic buildings in Kingston to create the Kinsley Hotel. A payment in lieu of taxes (PILOT) agreement with the Ulster County Industrial Development Agency saved his company $1.4 million on the project.

The developer said he was offered the Rock Ledge property about 10 years ago; his initial project was to build an inn. When this proposal encountered local opposition, he turned to residential housing.

The proposed condominium community would be developed on a 135-acre site that once housed the Starr Miller Estate, built by renowned New York architects Frank Hoppin and Whitney Warren for Warren’s brother, William Starr Miller, and his wife. More recently, the property was sold to Daytop Village Foundation, Inc. in 1987 to operate as an addiction treatment center, which housed 50 people and included staff offices and a gym. Daytop closed in 2009 and the site has been vacant ever since.

Eight of the 36 homes in Blaichman’s proposed development would be built in buildings listed on the National Register of Historic Places; the remaining 28 condos would be brand new. The property would also include a recreation center in a redeveloped historic carriage house and a security gatehouse in a historic stone house.

Property needs rezoning, sewer upgrades

Opposition residents are primarily led by the Rhinebeck Coalition and an informal group known as the Rock Ledge Neighbors. The main reported concern is the request for a zoning variance to allow more than one house per five acres and the subsequent impact on traffic and natural habitats.

The Rock Ledge development “makes the enjoyment of the rural community very difficult,” Weiner said. “Ackert Hill Road is a windy, hilly road that people travel on foot, on horseback and on bikes. To dump more traffic on a rural road like this is a hazard.


At a public planning council hearing on February 7 to review the site plan, applications for special use permits and wetland permits, residents also expressed concern that the new development would use the nearby Fallsburg Creek for the discharge of sewage from the property’s on-site sewer. plant, and urged that special attention be given to conservation and public trails.

“There is concern that if something goes wrong with the plant, it would be extremely damaging to the creek and the swamp,” Weiner said.

However, Blaichman described it as a “non-issue” and said the development will bring the sewage plant, which was last operated by Daytop Village, up to modern standards.

Blaichman also said there will be trails throughout the property for the public to enjoy. Currently, the Vlei Swamp Reserve includes two hiking loops through 165 acres of wetlands near the property.

Although the development would bring more housing to the community, Weiner said it was not the type of housing that was needed. A price has yet to be set for the condos, which Blaichman described as “luxury units…that look like big farmhouses.”

“Housing is definitely a concern,” Weiner said. “The city should be concerned about workforce housing that is built near transportation or on a major highway (and) that is affordable.”

Blaichman said his team conducted outreach with neighbors to discuss the plan before the pandemic and more recently sent out information flyers. He insists that most members of the community support the project. “I had very good reactions from 95% of the neighbors, and most people are happy with it,” he said. “There are a few people who are not. … I feel good about it. We want this done.

CB Developers has invested $7.5 million in the project to date. If it materializes, the total investment would be nearly $45 million and would, according to Blaichman, help bring this decaying field back to life.

“I think the city is focused on preserving all of its historic buildings,” he said, adding that he thought his project would help them achieve that. “You’re never going to build those things again. They are so important to the story.

Currently, the project is before the Town of Rhinebeck Planning Board pending completion of an environmental review, including updated sewage reports.

The next CB Developer Planning Board meeting to be presented is May 2, when a public hearing period will reopen.

For more information on real estate in the Hudson Valley



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8 professional travelers offer road trip ideas https://po-pon.org/8-professional-travelers-offer-road-trip-ideas/ Fri, 01 Apr 2022 06:04:17 +0000 https://po-pon.org/8-professional-travelers-offer-road-trip-ideas/ Wiltser/Getty Images Mackinac Island A little luxury around the Great Lakes Driver: Pauline Frommer, 57, editorial director of Frommer travel guides and editor of Frommers.com Or : The Chic Pockets of Northern Michigan Tales from the road: Wealthy people have been vacationing in northern Michigan since the 1880s, after the arrival of railroad transportation. Later, […]]]>




Wiltser/Getty Images

Mackinac Island

A little luxury around the Great Lakes

Driver: Pauline Frommer, 57, editorial director of Frommer travel guides and editor of Frommers.com

Or : The Chic Pockets of Northern Michigan

Tales from the road: Wealthy people have been vacationing in northern Michigan since the 1880s, after the arrival of railroad transportation. Later, automobile titans built their summer residences here. But for most Americans, the area is still a secret. I remember going to a music camp in the area when I was a kid. People I didn’t know smiled at me and said hello. Being a New Yorker, I was immediately suspicious, but learned that openness and friendliness was just part of Michigan culture. It was like being on another planet, but in a good way. For the past few years, I’ve been to the National Cherry Festival and recklessly tried to compete by spitting out cherry pits. The woman in front of me kicked seven feet, but I could barely keep the pits from hitting my feet. Apparently people practice. It was hilarious fun.

Itinerary: Fly to Traverse City, grab a car and head north into the Leelanau Peninsula. This region, known for its cherries, hosts the National Cherry Festival in July. But I go for the grapes – and the vineyards. This is the decadent wine country of the Midwest. Black Star Farms looks like a Southern mansion. They have an exceptional restaurant and a luxurious hostel where you should spend the night. With the winds from the lake, the evenings get cooler here, which some white grapes need but no longer get in other wine regions due to climate change. You can also visit cider houses like Two K Farms, which makes hard ciders from over 30 different apple varieties. Leelanau Cheese wins awards for its silky shepherd’s cheese. Mawby is a sparkling wine house that brings unexpected bubbles to this part of the country.

I attended what used to be called the National Music Camp. Now it’s known as Interlochen, and they have amazing performances from major artists that you normally only see in big cities, like Yo-Yo Ma. If you’re in that area, you really should travel to Sleeping Bear Dunes National Lakeshore and see some of the steepest dunes on the planet, with the blue Caribbean lake as your backdrop.

There’s an annual film festival in Traverse City and a destination-worthy farm-to-table restaurant called The Cooks’ House, where food is grown or picked locally. If you head north on Route 31 overlooking Grand Traverse Bay, you’ll come to Petoskey, a resort town on the northern end of the Lower Peninsula. The Inn at Bay Harbor is a beautiful place for a luxury stay, right on the water with all the services of a large resort. Along the way, stop at the Music House Museum in Williamsburg, which has an amazing collection of music boxes and antique automated instruments.

Also plan a short stay at Treetops Resort, especially if you are a golfer. The latest course designed by Robert Trent Jones Sr. is one of many places worth playing. It’s called Masterpiece, and it really is. Golf one day and fly fish the next. The Au Sable River is legendary for trout. You can get a guide to show you the best casting spots.

It takes about an hour to reach Mackinaw City and the ferry to Mackinac Island, where cars are not allowed. Everyone travels by horse-drawn carriage or bicycle. You should stay at the Grand Hotel, which claims to have the largest porch in the world. Where is it somewhere in time was filmed, and once a year people come from all over the world dressed as characters. Or you can just sit back sipping a cocktail as the sun sets over the water. It really is quite magical.

The stories above were told to David Hochman, longtime editor for AARP: the magazine and AARP Newsletter. His signatures appear in The New York Times, Forbes, GQ, Food + Wine and many other publications.​​

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