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Sununu: People “still have time” to get vaccinated before the outbreak | Ap

Here are the latest developments regarding the ongoing novel coronavirus pandemic:

New HampshireNew Hampshire is seeing an increase in COVID-19 cases, and state officials are urging people to get vaccinated before an anticipated increase in the fall.

“The vaccine is a way out. You need to get vaccinated, ”Governor Chris Sununu said at a press conference Thursday.

Sununu said authorities are looking at what is happening in other parts of the country, such as Florida, which has a high hospitalization and death rate. He said New Hampshire residents “still have time” to get vaccinated to make sure those high rates don’t reach the state.

He said the outbreak in New Hampshire, expected in November and December, “could be as bad as anything we’ve seen.”

As of Thursday, 822,000 inhabitants had received at least a first dose of vaccine and 752,000 people were fully vaccinated, or 53.8%. About 1,000 people get vaccinated every week.

Sununu said communities, schools and businesses should plan for the long term by thinking about their efforts and methods to prevent the spread of the virus.

“But whatever those decisions are today, understand that they may be in place for a while,” he said.

He added, “We’re not just putting mitigation efforts in our communities, in our workplaces for the next month or two, hoping COVID is gone by Christmas. He won’t be gone by Christmas, anyway. “

Pandemic program fraud: Two New Hampshire men have been charged with participating in schemes to defraud government programs that provide economic aid linked to the coronavirus pandemic.

The men fired workers at two companies they controlled, according to a federal indictment. However, they ordered workers to continue working for the companies while collecting unemployment insurance payments from the New Hampshire employment security agency.

The payments included additional weekly emergency benefits of $ 600 under the federal CARES Act, according to the indictment.

The indictment also alleges that one of the men, who is also charged with aggravated identity theft, applied for an economic disaster loan funded by the US Small Business Administration and a loan from the Personal Protection Program. paychecks. He allegedly provided false information on loan applications and improperly used the personal identification information of one of the company’s employees to obtain the funds.

The two men were arrested on Wednesday and released pending trial, which is scheduled for October 5.

Messages to their lawyers seeking comment were left on Thursday.

FEMA: The Federal Emergency Management Agency has awarded more than $ 375,000 to support New Hampshire firefighters.

The following communities have received grants: Nashua, Dover, North Hampton, Gilmanton, Bristol and Northwood.

Grants can be used for training, equipment acquisition, personal protective equipment, wellness and fitness activities, and fire station / EMS modifications.

The state congressional delegation announced the funds on Thursday.

Numbers: Nearly 103,000 people have tested positive for the virus in New Hampshire, including 268 cases announced on Friday. One new death was announced, bringing the total to 1,395.

The seven-day moving average of daily new cases in New Hampshire has increased over the past two weeks, from 64 new cases per day on July 28 to 165 new cases per day on Wednesday.

VermontWaterbury-based solar power company SunCommon has said that starting August 23, it will require its 200 employees to be vaccinated against COVID-19.

The company announced the new policy on Thursday. It will apply to employees in Vermont and Rhinebeck, New York.

“This was not decided lightly,” SunCommon co-chairman Duane Peterson said in a statement sent to employees.

“But the wave of dangerous infection brought by the delta variant has forced this final step – to protect our beloved employees and their families, and our customers,” he said.

The company said a survey conducted earlier this year found that 94% of the company’s employees were already vaccinated.

People with documented medical conditions that prevent vaccination or whose religious practices prevent vaccination may be exempted in exchange for a weekly COVID-19 test. Those who start a two-step vaccination can show proof of the first vaccine by August 23.

“People who have not shared their vaccination documentation by Aug. 23 will lose their SunCommon job,” the Peterson statement said.

Fair returns: The Addison County Fair and Field Days are in full swing after being canceled last summer along with other fairs to prevent the spread of the coronavirus.

The five-day fair runs until Saturday evening.

“It’s really good to be back,” Benj Deppman, one of the event’s directors, told NECN.

According to the fair’s website, organizers are demanding that event directors, paid employees and contractors be vaccinated against COVID-19 and strongly recommend vaccines for volunteers and masks for any unvaccinated people entering. inside.

“A lot of our buildings have great ventilation and are wide open at the ends,” Deppman said. “I just felt it was a good decision to come back. “

Middlebury Regional EMS is at the fairgrounds and offers the Johnson & Johnson single dose vaccine.

“Cotton candy, fried dough and your vaccine,” said Rick Iffland of Middlebury Regional EMS.

Numbers: The Vermont Department of Health reported 107 cases of the virus that causes COVID-19 on Friday, bringing the statewide total since the start of the pandemic to nearly 26,050.

There have been 23 people hospitalized with COVID-19, including seven in intensive care.

The state reported one new death, bringing the statewide total since the start of the pandemic to 264.

The seven-day moving average of daily new cases in Vermont has increased over the past two weeks, from 26.14 new cases per day on July 28 to 94.86 new cases per day on Wednesday.

The Associated Press uses data collected by the Johns Hopkins University Center for Systems Science and Engineering to measure the number of cases and deaths related to epidemics in the United States.


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Justine T. Smith

The author Justine T. Smith

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